Blog Post

When you just don’t get it right

Have you ever had one of those “I can’t believe I said that” moments?
I just had one. “Did that just come out of my mouth?” I thought as I sank into my chair.
A co-worker made a remark about a project I was working on and had not completed one of the elements.
I snapped back.

Granted, I had been working twelve-hour days for the last week and my steam was running out, but that’s no excuse.
I felt bad before I even saw the look on his face. I hadn’t used any unprofessional language, but it just wasn’t like me to snap.

What do you do when you have one of those moments?
I know we’ve all done things that we wish we never did.
Unfortunately, we can’t turn back time and start over.

I find it comforting that Jesus never berated others for mistakes or selfishness. He had so many opportunities with his disciples. They were always saying or doing things that deserved correction.

Matthew 20:21 comes to mind.
Peter and James go with their Mother to ask Jesus if they can sit on his right and left hand in heaven. I can’t even imagine the gumption it would take to do that! Did they even know who they were talking to? That’s a question Jesus asked them several times. “Who do you say I am?”
I can bet that, years later, upon thinking back on this moment in time, they became red in the face with embarrassment.

But how did Jesus react? There was no berating. No lecture. No telling them what a stupid question or comment that was. He simply said, “That’s for my Father to decide.” Instead of putting them down, He gathered all the disciples together and used it as a teaching moment.
He corrects but doesn’t fault. He knows our weaknesses.

Hebrews 4:15-16 (CEV)
Jesus understands every weakness of ours because he was tempted in every way that we are. But he did not sin! 16 So whenever we are in need, we should come bravely before the throne of our merciful God. There we will be treated with undeserved kindness, and we will find help.
I’m so thankful for God’s gentleness and patience.

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